Re: semaphore

From: Goncalo Costa (goncalo.costa@kpnqwest.pt)
Date: Wed Jan 09 2002 - 01:47:09 PST

  • Next message: Nikos Mouat: "Re: semaphore"

    >> I get similiar errors when trying to start cflowdmux:
    >>
    >> # strings /usr/local/arts/sbin/cflowdmux | grep cflowdmux.cc
    >> cflowdmux.cc
    >> @(#) $Name: cflowd-2-1-b1 $ $Id: cflowdmux.cc,v 1.31 2000/10/24 16:18:54
    >> dwm Exp $ # uname -a
    >> SunOS netra 5.7 Generic_106541-18 sun4u sparc
    >> # /usr/local/arts/sbin/cflowdmux
    >> #
    >>
    >> and /var/adm/messages shows:
    >>
    >> Jan 8 11:08:13 netra cflowdmux[7726]: [E]
    >> shmget(ftok("/usr/local/arts/etc/cflowd.conf",0),2101248,IPC_CREAT|S_IRWXU
    >>|S_IRGRP|S_IROTH) failed: No such file or directory
    >> {CflowdPacketQueue.cc:241} Jan 8 11:08:13 netra cflowdmux[7726]: [A]
    >> g_packetQueue.Create("/usr/local/arts/etc/cflowd.conf",2097152) failed: No
    >> such file or directory {cflowdmux.cc:457} Jan 8 11:08:13 netra
    >> cflowdmux[7726]: [A] failed to create packet queue! Exiting.
    >> {cflowdmux.cc:459}
    >>

    Could it be the max shared mem segment size ?
    Have you seen this in INSTALL:

    " Solaris
      -------
        cflowdmux uses shared memory for inter-process communication.
        The shared memory is used for packet buffering, and cflowdmux
        uses a default shared memory segment of 1 megabyte (which
        can be changed with the PKTBUFSIZE setting in cflowd.conf).
     
        Solaris is usually installed with a low default for the maximum
        shared memory segment size (typically 1 megabyte). If you want to
        use a larger shared memory packet buffer for cflowdmux, you may
        need to increase the system limit before starting cflowdmux
        by adding a line like the following to /etc/system:
     
          set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=16777216
     
        This sets the maximum shared memory segment size to 16 megabytes.
        No resources are allocated by this setting, so it's generally safe
        to increase it. You can view the current setting by running
        'sysdef'. After changing /etc/system, you need to reboot for the
        new setting to take effect."

    Goncalo

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