Re: semaphore

From: Nikos Mouat (nikm@cyberflunk.com)
Date: Wed Jan 09 2002 - 06:10:10 PST

  • Next message: Ashwin Sharma: "make error"

    Yeah, that was it... :(

    On Wed, 9 Jan 2002, Goncalo Costa wrote:

    >
    > >> I get similiar errors when trying to start cflowdmux:
    > >>
    > >> # strings /usr/local/arts/sbin/cflowdmux | grep cflowdmux.cc
    > >> cflowdmux.cc
    > >> @(#) $Name: cflowd-2-1-b1 $ $Id: cflowdmux.cc,v 1.31 2000/10/24 16:18:54
    > >> dwm Exp $ # uname -a
    > >> SunOS netra 5.7 Generic_106541-18 sun4u sparc
    > >> # /usr/local/arts/sbin/cflowdmux
    > >> #
    > >>
    > >> and /var/adm/messages shows:
    > >>
    > >> Jan 8 11:08:13 netra cflowdmux[7726]: [E]
    > >> shmget(ftok("/usr/local/arts/etc/cflowd.conf",0),2101248,IPC_CREAT|S_IRWXU
    > >>|S_IRGRP|S_IROTH) failed: No such file or directory
    > >> {CflowdPacketQueue.cc:241} Jan 8 11:08:13 netra cflowdmux[7726]: [A]
    > >> g_packetQueue.Create("/usr/local/arts/etc/cflowd.conf",2097152) failed: No
    > >> such file or directory {cflowdmux.cc:457} Jan 8 11:08:13 netra
    > >> cflowdmux[7726]: [A] failed to create packet queue! Exiting.
    > >> {cflowdmux.cc:459}
    > >>
    >
    > Could it be the max shared mem segment size ?
    > Have you seen this in INSTALL:
    >
    > " Solaris
    > -------
    > cflowdmux uses shared memory for inter-process communication.
    > The shared memory is used for packet buffering, and cflowdmux
    > uses a default shared memory segment of 1 megabyte (which
    > can be changed with the PKTBUFSIZE setting in cflowd.conf).
    >
    > Solaris is usually installed with a low default for the maximum
    > shared memory segment size (typically 1 megabyte). If you want to
    > use a larger shared memory packet buffer for cflowdmux, you may
    > need to increase the system limit before starting cflowdmux
    > by adding a line like the following to /etc/system:
    >
    > set shmsys:shminfo_shmmax=16777216
    >
    > This sets the maximum shared memory segment size to 16 megabytes.
    > No resources are allocated by this setting, so it's generally safe
    > to increase it. You can view the current setting by running
    > 'sysdef'. After changing /etc/system, you need to reboot for the
    > new setting to take effect."
    >
    > Goncalo
    >

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